I am yet to see Roma... from the Mexican film Prodigy Alfonso Cuarón... but I can assure most viewers that this review is wrong. “Roma” is not about the Mexican middle class, and nothing about the film is typical of a middle class family in this City, let alone this country.

To insist that a middle class family in this country can, or could in the 1970s, have two cars, a relatively large apartment in a downtown neighborhood, and two maids is hilariously classist in-and of itself. It’s almost as out of touch as saying “Let them eat cake”

Also, Jorge Ramos is not from a middle class family either, as he sort-of infers in the article. His father was an Architect during the Mexican post modern period (as in, he was resourceful) and he attended Universidad Iberoamericana, a expensive private university for Communications.

“Communications” students are (or were for a long time) also amongst the least likely to have a scholarship to this school.

An average maid has a salary of 6,000 pesos per month, while according to AMAI, a typical middle class family earns around 13,500-40,000 a month.

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To even assume that a person in the middle class can shed 44-15% of their income to pay for a maid is just disturbingly unrealistic and downright irresponsible.

How can we be so classist that we talk about classism in our country while simultaneously being classist ourselves?

Also, Roma neighborhood isn’t middle class. It has never been so. It was designed by Mexican Dictator Porfirio Diaz alongside Condesa to emulate the large boulevards of Paris and other European capitals in Mexico city together with European architecture with interior gardens. You can visit many of those buildings today, the ones that remain have been turned (mostly) into tourist traps.

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From the same source from which I took the incomes, “81% of Mexicans think they are in the middle class, when in reality only 32% does”... which might explain the discrepancies between Ramos' recollection and reality.