If you've noticed that being offended has become increasingly popular, you're certainly not alone. Chris Rock said in a recent interview that he had to stop performing at colleges because everything is offensive to them.

His interview with Vulture covers a lot of interesting topics. Politics, comedy, even the James Taylor. But it was his comments on butthurt millenials that really stood out as a profound indication of the differences between the 18 - 24 demographic of today vs. decades prior.

What do you make of the attempt to bar Bill Maher from speaking at Berkeley for his riff on Muslims?

Well, I love Bill, but I stopped playing colleges, and the reason is because they're way too conservative.

In their political views?

Not in their political views — not like they're voting Republican — but in their social views and their willingness not to offend anybody. Kids raised on a culture of "We're not going to keep score in the game because we don't want anybody to lose." Or just ignoring race to a fault. You can't say "the black kid over there." No, it's "the guy with the red shoes." You can't even be offensive on your way to being inoffensive.

When did you start to notice this?

About eight years ago. Probably a couple of tours ago. It was just like, This is not as much fun as it used to be. I remember talking to George Carlin before he died and him saying the exact same thing.

How did we get to this point? Was Christina Hoff-Sommers onto something when she appeared on The Daily Show in 2005 to discuss the phenomenon of parents overreacting to self esteem issues?

That was nearly 10 years ago. The elementary school students affected by the changes she mentioned are now old enough to be the college kids who overreacted to Chris Rock's stand-up material. Is this just a coincidence? What's really going on here?